Royal Botanic Gardens of Edinburgh

Designed by Edward Cullinan Architects, the John Hope Gateway Building is the gateway to the world-renowned Royal Botanic Garden of Edinburgh.  The new centre houses exhibitions and a studio space for demonstrations and exploration into the world of plants.

Built of KLH timber panels, glulam beams, glass and stone the Gateway cuts its impact on the environment with a range of renewable energy systems including biomass fuelled boilers, rainwater recovery, and a roof mounted wind turbine.

Royal Botanic Gardens of Edinburgh

Carbon Calculation

  • KLH cross-laminated timber volume for Royal Botanic Gardens of Edinburgh is 674m3
  • KLH panels removed approximately 539.2 tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere
  • 35.4 tonnes of emitted CO2 from transporting the KLH panels from Austria to Edinburgh
  • Offsetting the CO2 emissions from the transport therefore shows a 'nett gain' of 503.8 tonnes (CO2 removed from the atmosphere)

 

Ultimately, the timber superstructure for the Royal Botanic Gardens of Edinburgh contains approximately 161.8 tonnes of sequestered/stored carbon.

Royal Botanic Gardens of Edinburgh

Project Details

Project Value:  Confidential

Project Dates:  2008 - 2009

Service:  Supply

Timber Volume:  674m3

Royal Botanic Gardens of Edinburgh

Design Team

Architect:  Edward Cullinan Architects

Timber Engineer:  Techniker

Structural Engineer:  Buro Happold

Contractor:  Xiron Ltd